SA Health has had a digital health win with its new post-surgery cloud-based patient monitoring system going live at the state’s flagship Royal Adelaide Hospital.

Delivered by Allscripts in partnership with iProcedures, the iPro Post-Anaesthesia Care Unit module (PACU) allows recovery room nurses to record patients’ post-operative data in real time.

Designed by anaesthesiologists to improve patient safety, documentation, hospital efficiency and medication management, more than 1000 patients have already been administered in the system since it was implemented two weeks ago.

The Royal Adelaide Hospital’s AIMS project manager Paul Dawkins said the feedback from clinical staff has been overwhelmingly positive.

“When you get anaesthetists going out of their way to visit you to thank you for AIMS, you know it is doing a good job,” he said.

“One of the overarching comments is how simple it is to use and how great a job we – the RAH project team, Allscripts and iProcedures – have done, and how well we listened to what they wanted.”

It is the latest stage in the implementation of the anaesthesia information management system (AIMS), which has seen the roll-out of a cloud-based, digital anaesthesia documentation system in stages.

Allscripts was appointed by SA Health to deliver AIMS at Royal Adelaide Hospital in 2017.

The iPro IntraOp module went live at RAH in December and is currently in use in 33 operating theatres in the state’s 800-bed, state-of-the-art flagship hospital. Almost 7000 cases have gone through that system already, averaging about 64 cases on a week day with a high of 88. The Acute Pain module went live in March.

Together with the IntraOp module, the most significant benefit at this stage of the PACU implementation is the automated tracking of vitals, which allows clinicians to focus more attention on direct patient care.

RAH Anaesthetist Dr Ted Murphy has been actively involved in the implementation of iPro

across the hospital and said that, together with the IntraOp module, the most significant benefit at this stage of the implementation is the automated tracking of vitals, which allows clinicians to focus more attention on direct patient care.

“Once the other modules and analytics package are implemented we look forward to the use of extensive audit capabilities,” Murphy said.

“The remainder of IntraOp AIMS assists in tracking other events such as anaesthesia procedures, start of surgery, when medications were given and the estimated quantity of medication for infusions.”

The system caters for all recovery room patients regardless of whether anaesthesia was involved.

The implementation is a boost in digital fortunes for Royal Adelaide Hospital, with South Australia’s EPAS system described as a “failure” by the state government in June. A SA Health spokesperson confirmed earlier this month that it is costing the state $192,000 a month to store paper patient records off-site and deliver thousands to the hospital each day.

To share tips, news or announcements, contact the HITNA editor on lynne.minion@himssmedia.com

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